Category Archives: Call for papers

Workshop 2017 Call for Papers

ISHTIP

International Society for the History and Theory of Intellectual Property

9th Annual Workshop

CILP & the Faculty of Information, University of Toronto, Canada

July 12-14, 2017

Intellectual Property as Circulation and Control’

CALL FOR PAPERS

This year’s workshop will seek to explore all aspects of the circulation/control dilemma from historical and/or contemporary perspectives.  Modalities of control that might be considered include:  licensing practices; distribution and business models; collectivization; cultural appropriation; authors, inventors and ownership; criminal provisions; international trade agreements; technological means of control such as technological protection measures, anti-circumvention laws, search engines and aggregators; surveillance and policing by law enforcement agencies, ISPs, trolls; and organized resistance to corporate control by users and pirate movements.

Download the Call for Papers: ISHTIP2017

Register for the Workshop: http://ishtip2017.eventbrite.ca

Book your Hotel: ISHTIP2017 at the Intercontinental

The Centre for Innovation Law and Policy is pleased to partner with the Intercontinental Hotel to offer workshop participants a special rate of $229.00 (plus taxes and fees). The rate is available until June 12, 2017, or until supplies last!  Simply select “Book Now” in the upper right-hand corner, enter the workshop dates, and you will be taken to a page with our special group rate (GW9).

Workshop 2016 Call for Papers

ISHTIP

International Society for the History and Theory of Intellectual Property

8th Annual Workshop

CREATe, University of Glasgow, UK

July 6-8, 2016

Intellectual Property and Resistance’

CALL FOR PAPERS

In 2016, ISHTIP comes to Scotland, the home of booksellers such as Alexander Donaldson who sought to resist the monopolistic practices of their established London-based rivals, in the so-called Battle of the Booksellers of the eighteenth century. The patriotic Scottish booksellers, newcomers to the trade, sold cheap reprints of books sold by the London booksellers, including those in which statutory copyright, under the Statute of Anne 1710, had expired. The London booksellers responded with a series of lawsuits culminating in Donaldson v. Becket (1774), relying inter alia on copyright at common law, against which the Scots resisted. As Donaldson expressed in petitioning the House of Commons in 1774: ‘your petitioner has had to struggle with the united force of almost all the eminent booksellers of London and Westminster… above one hundred of the most opulent booksellers… have in their turn, been plaintiffs against your petitioner’. The resulting cases and more general debate about the nature of literary property are today remembered as a historic occasion on which the nature of copyright, as well as the more general notion of property in intangibles, was fully debated.

Taking the theme of ‘resistance’ as its starting point, we intend the 8th Annual Workshop to be a further occasion for the full debate of the theory and history of intellectual property! We invite abstracts for papers, exploring the theme of resistance in the broadest sense, in relation to any aspect of the history or theory of intellectual property law, in particular, but not limited to: historical or theoretical research that provides a basis for resisting dominant conceptions of IP law, its theory or history, or resisting claims relating to its timelessness or universality; historical or theoretical papers exploring IP law as empowering resistance to dominant social or cultural norms or relations of social power; historical or theoretical research into local diversity in IP laws (legislative, judicial and/or bureaucratic approaches) resisting moves towards international, imperial or regional harmonisation; historical and theoretical insights into modes of resistance to IP law, its enforcement and/or its exploitation.

We seek a broad representation of international scholars as well as scholars from across the disciplines. Papers may concern trade marks, patents, copyright, or related rights, including confidentiality and trade secrecy, and they may be historical or address current issues from a theoretically-informed perspective. Both established and junior scholars are encouraged to submit abstracts. We are keen to receive abstracts from those who have not recently presented at an ISHTIP workshop, particularly scholars who did not present at ISHTIP 2015.

To be considered for the workshop, please submit a 300-word abstract of your proposed paper as well as a one-paragraph bio and 2-page CV by 15 January 2016 to ishtip@create.ac.uk . Acceptance will be notified by 15 March 2016.

Complete papers (of max. 9000 words) will be due on 1 June 2016 so that they may be distributed in advance to registered workshop participants. Papers must be unpublished and not accepted/under consideration for publication elsewhere. It is expected that the best papers will be published in a special issue of an academic peer-reviewed journal or an edited collection.

Authors do not present their papers at ISHTIP workshops. Instead, a discussant presents a brief summary and critique to initiate the general discussion of each paper. All panels are plenary. ISHTIP workshops are thus a great venue for presenting and receiving feedback on work in progress from a global, multidisciplinary community of scholars.

For additional information, including past programs and 2015 program updates, visit the ISHTIP website at www.ishtip.org. Should you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Elena Cooper of the CREATe team (elena.cooper@glasgow.ac.uk).

Fourth Annual ISHTIP Workshop

Call for Papers

Fourth Annual ISHTIP Workshop:

Intellectual property as cultural technology

London School of Economics, 25 & 26 June 2012

Intellectual property rights are generally supposed to function as means of stimulating and diffusing cultural production. This instrumentalist understanding of how intellectual property works as a cultural technology has survived for more than two centuries; it has been amplified and refined by a long tradition of economic analysis and economic history, and it has now been retrenched as the basic premise of contemporary debates about public domains, digital commons, and the expansion of corporate semiotic power. How plausible or illuminating is this pervasive representation of the agency of intellectual property rights?

There are some familiar ways of testing this representation. Lawyers and economists ask whether patent laws work as they should in the domains of, for example, software or biomedical innovation, they speculate as to the reasons why creativity in the fashion industry seems to flourish in a ‘negative space’ (a domain unframed by copyright law), and they ask how formal intellectual property rights work with ‘social norms’. But these lines of inquiry still reduce culture to what can be rendered in terms of scarcity, efficiency, and instrumentality.

The theme of this conference seeks to elicit alternative approaches to the cultural implications of intellectual property and cultural property laws. A rubric that turns on the terms ‘culture’ and ‘technology’ can only be open-ended, but the following questions might be taken as a rough starting point for reflection:

  1. How might we understand the implication of different forms of intellectual or cultural property in economic, political, aesthetic, or scientific cultures? How might we schematize the ‘functions’ or ‘effects’ of intellectual property law in terms other than those of instrumentality, efficiency, or repressive power?
  2. Do intellectual property regimes themselves have specific cultures? Here, ethnographic, historical, or sociological analyses might reveal the specific practices, techniques and media that condition the existence and effects of intellectual property forms.
  3. Might we understand intellectual property as a mode of cultural creativity in its own right? Intellectual property law has evolved a complex set of fictions, semantic artifacts, themes, and figures that have an existence in broader cultural life, not just as agents of encouragement or constraint, but as conceptual resources that have shaped the discursive fields of various social cultures. Somewhat more abstractly, regimes of intellectual property have turned the improbable notion of ‘intangible property’, or of ‘intangible things’, into common currency. So, instead of seeing legal forms as secondary ratifications of cultural figures, might we instead explore intellectual property law’s own cultural intelligence and authorship?

We invite contributions from established and doctoral scholars working in the broad field of the humanities and the social sciences, including anthropology, economic history, history of science, media studies, literary theory, science studies, and critical theory, as well as legal history and legal theory.

Papers selected for presentation at the workshop will be circulated in advance to registered participants. Abstracts of proposed papers (together with a brief author bio) should be submitted by 1 March 2012. A maximum length of 9,000 words is recommended.

Important dates

  • Submission of proposal (abstract and bio): 1 March 2012
  • Notification of acceptance: 31 March 2012
  • Submission of paper: 1 June 2012
  • Workshop: 25-26 June 2012

Contacts

For information and programme updates visit the ISHTIP website

Please also visit the specific website for the Workshop at the LSE

Abstracts and author bios can be submitted to any of the following, who will circulate these to the Program Committee.

Alain Pottage, Law Department, LSE: r.a.pottage@lse.ac.uk

Tatiana Flessas, Law Department, LSE: t.flessas@lse.ac.uk

Dev Gangjee, Law Department, LSE: d.gangjee@lse.ac.uk

 

Third Annual ISHTIP workshop

Call for abstracts:

We invite you to submit an abstract to the Workshop addressing the broad ambitions of the society from all Disciplinary and Interdisciplinary perspectives. Papers that reflect global politics, colonial, post-colonial, Commonwealth or Asia-Pacific themes are especially welcome. Abstracts are due by 1 March 2011 and authors are requested to submit abstracts for a presentation of around 45 minutes in duration.

Please email abstracts for consideration by the ISHTIP Steering Committee to Professor Kathy Bowrey: k.bowrey@unsw.edu.au

Important Dates:

  • Abstract submission deadline: 1 March 2011
  • Notification of acceptance: 31 March 2011
  • Final registration: 6 June 2011
  • Final deadline full paper submission: 14 June 2011
  • Workshop: 5-6 July 2011

Please circulate:

>>>> ISHTIP 2011 Workshop flyer <<<<

Cost:

Conference Attendance

  • Aust$200.00 per delegate which includes: refreshments on arrival; morning and afternoon tea; and lunch on both days.

Conference Dinner

  • Aust$80.00 per person for dinner and drinks on Tuesday 5 July starting at 19:00.

To Register:

Complete the registration form attached and return it by fax or email.

>>>>> Registration Form <<<<<<

Enquiries: Clare Inwood

Emailishtip@griffith.edu.au

Phone: 61 (0)7 3735 3747